International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
DEVELOPMENT, SHARED FATE AND THE DEMAND OF 'SPECIAL STATE' STATUS IN INDIA

Authors:
MUKESH KUMAR JHA

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MUKESH KUMAR JHA
Research Scholar (PhD), Centre for the Study of Law and Governance, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi- 110067

MLA 8
JHA, MUKESH KUMAR. "DEVELOPMENT, SHARED FATE AND THE DEMAND OF 'SPECIAL STATE' STATUS IN INDIA." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 3, no. 7, July 2018, pp. 3004-3015, ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=206. Accessed 2018.
APA
JHA, M. (2018, July). DEVELOPMENT, SHARED FATE AND THE DEMAND OF 'SPECIAL STATE' STATUS IN INDIA. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 3(7), 3004-3015. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=206
Chicago
JHA, MUKESH KUMAR. "DEVELOPMENT, SHARED FATE AND THE DEMAND OF 'SPECIAL STATE' STATUS IN INDIA." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 3, no. 7 (July 2018), 3004-3015. Accessed , 2018. ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=206.

References
[1]. The state of Bihar becomes the focal point of the debate, in this essay, on the demand of special state status as the issue was raised very vociferously by the chief minister of Bihar Nitish Kumar even though the similar demands were raised by different states in different parts of India especially Orissa and West Bengal. Though the different contexts are instrumental in shaping the intent as well content of the demand by the various states, but I think a common minimal argument, which is coming out of this essay, could be extended to all the differential contexts as far as the language of the demand is concerned.
[2]. It is unfortunate that the issue of demand of 'special state' status in India has not got even the minimum space in academic journals. The newspaper editorials and the electronic media have tried to fulfill the space with opinions, rather with a well documented research. Also, the opinions have functioned on the minimalist levels. It has discussed only the pros and cons of the demand rather the nature and the language of demand itself.
[3]. Nowhere, I want to claim that the way out presented in the paper is exhaustive in nature. It is one of the several possible way out many would look forward to come out from the present dilemma of Bihar's demand. Having, but, different and even stronger way out does not mean Bihar's demand of 'special state' status is not based on the contradictory imaginations. One important intention regarding the selection of this topic, for the seminar paper, is to start a debate and discussion on the burning issue of Bihar. So, the clear intention is to initiate a discussion rather than an attempt towards the hasty solutions.
[4]. See, L. Tillin, Remapping India: New States and Their Political Origins, London: C Hurst & Co. Publishers, 2013.
[5]. See, Registrar General and Census Commissioner of India, Census of India, 2011.
[6]. See, Arnab Mukherjee and Anjan Mukherjee, 'Bihar: What Went Wrong? And What Changed?', National Institute of Public Finance and Policy, New Delhi, Working Paper No. 2012-107, Sep. 2012.
[7]. See, Anil Kumar Singh, Bihar: Chaos to Chaos, Delhi: Har-Anand Publications, 2013.
[8]. Ibid.,
[9]. See, Arvind N. Das, 'Changel: Three Centuries of an Indian Village', Journal of Peasant Studies, Vol. 15, Issue 1, 1987; and, The Republic of Bihar, New Delhi: Penguin, 1992.
[10]. See, N. Sengupta, 'Agrarian Movements in Bihar', Journal of Peasant Studies, Vol. 9, Issue 3, 1982.
[11]. See, Anil Kumar Singh, Bihar: Chaos to Chaos, Delhi: Har-Anand Publications, 2013.
[12]. See, Pradhan H Prasad, Gerry B Rodgers, Shaibal Gupta, Alakh N Sharma, and B. Sharma, The Dynamics of Employment and Poverty in Bihar, Patna: A. N. Sinha Institute of Social Studies, 1988.
[13]. See, Kedarnath Prasad, Economics of Industrialization, New Delhi: Sarup & Sons, 2004.
[14]. See, R. N. Chopra, Green Revolution in India: The Relevance of Administrative Support for its Success: a study of Punjab, Haryana, U.P & Bihar, New Delhi: Intellectual Publishing House, 1986.
[15]. See, Anil Kumar Singh, Bihar: Chaos to Chaos, Delhi: Har-Anand Publications, 2013.
[16]. See, Institute for Human Development, Aiming at Inclusive Development in Bihar: Social and Economic Change in Rural Bihar and Emerging Policy Frameworks, New Delhi: Institute for Human Development, 2011; and, Mid-Term Appraisal of the Eleventh Five Year Plan for Bihar, New Delhi: Institute for Human Development, 2011.
[17]. See, A. S. Oberai, Pradhan H. Prasad, and M. G. Sardana, Determinants and Consequences of Internal Migration in India: Studies in Bihar, Kerala and Uttar Pradesh, Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1989; and also see, Alakh N Sharma, People on the Move: Nature and Implications of Migrations in a Backward Economy, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House, 1997.
[18]. See, Alakh N. Sharma, 'Political Economy of Poverty in Bihar', Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 30, No. 41 & 42, October, 1995; and, 'Agrarian Relations and Socio-Economic Change in Bihar', Economic and Political Weekly, March 5, 2005.
[19]. See, Arun Sinha, Nitish Kumar and the Rise of Bihar, Delhi: Penguin, 2011.
[20]. Government of India, Bihar's Agricultural Development: Opportunities and Challenges (A Report of the Special Task Force on Bihar), New Delhi: 2008.

Abstract:
Recent demand of 'Special State' status in India, led by Bihar, has been subject to opinion based justice by both print and electronic media. A serious attempt has not been taken to interrogate, though critically, the nature of demand, the language of demand and the development model coming out of these demand(s). Unless the language(s) of demand itself is/are subject to critical investigation, it is futile to concentrate the narrower debate on the pros and cons of the demand of the 'special state' status in India.