International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
Submit Paper

Title:
INCIDENCE AND CORRELATES OF CATASTROPHIC HEALTH EXPENDITURE AMONG TRIBAL HOUSEHOLDS IN KERALA

Authors:
Dr. SHABEER K P

|| ||

Dr. SHABEER K P
Assistant Professor, Post Graduate and Research Department of Economics, Government College Kodanchery, Kozhikode, Kerala 673580

MLA 8
K.P., Dr. SHABEER. "INCIDENCE AND CORRELATES OF CATASTROPHIC HEALTH EXPENDITURE AMONG TRIBAL HOUSEHOLDS IN KERALA." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 3, no. 7, July 2018, pp. 3032-3053, ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=209. Accessed 2018.
APA
K.P., D. (2018, July). INCIDENCE AND CORRELATES OF CATASTROPHIC HEALTH EXPENDITURE AMONG TRIBAL HOUSEHOLDS IN KERALA. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 3(7), 3032-3053. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=209
Chicago
K.P., Dr. SHABEER. "INCIDENCE AND CORRELATES OF CATASTROPHIC HEALTH EXPENDITURE AMONG TRIBAL HOUSEHOLDS IN KERALA." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 3, no. 7 (July 2018), 3032-3053. Accessed , 2018. ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=209.

References
[1]. Doorslaer, V. E., Odonnel, Elliya, R.P., and Somanathan, A. (2006). Effects of Payments for Health Care on Poverty Estimates in 11 Countries in Asia: An Analysis of Households Survey Data. Lancet, 368(9544), 1357-64.
[2]. George, A.T. (2005). Good Health at Low Cost: How Good and How Low. Economic and Political Weekly, 40(25), 2488-2491.
[3]. Kumar, G. (1993). Low Mortality and High Morbidity in Kerala Reconsidered. Population and Development Review, 19(1), 103-121.
[4]. Kunhikannan, T. P., and Aravindan, K.P.(1996). Family Health Expenditure after Liberalisation: Kerala Experience. Economic and Political Weekly, 31(2/3), 85-87.
[5]. Mukherjee, S.,Haddad, S., and Narayana, D. (2011).Social Class Related Inequalities in Household Health Expenditure and Economic Burden: Evidence from Kerala, South India. International Journal of Equity in Health, 10(1), http://doi.org/10.1186/1475-9276- 10-1.
[6]. Nair (2010). Understanding Below-replacement Fertility in Kerala, India. Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition, 28(4), 405-412.
[7]. Navaneetham,K ., Kabir M., and Krishnakumar, C.S. (2009). Morbidity Patterns in Kerala: Levels and Determinants. Working Paper 411, Centre for Development Studies, Thiruvananthapuram.
[8]. Panikar, P. G. K. (1992). High Cost of Medical Care in Kerala: Tentative Hypothesis. Economic and Political Weekly, 27(23), 1179-1181.
[9]. Rajasenan D, Abraham B G., and Rajeev, B (2013). Health, education and employment in a forward backward dichotomy based on standard of living index for the tribes in Kerala. Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development, 4(7), 100-106.
[10]. Ramankutty, V. (2000). Historical Analysis of the development of Health Care facilities in Kerala State, India. Health Policy and Planning, 15(1), 103-109.
[11]. Sadanandan, R. (2001). Government Health Services in Kerala: Who Benefits?. Economic and Political Weekly, 36(32), 3071-3077.
[12]. Sen, A. K. (2002).Health: Perception versus Observation. British Medical Journal, 324(7342), 860-61.
[13]. Shabeer K P and C Krishnan (2017). Health Status of Tribal communities in Kerala. International Journal of Research in Economics and Social Science, 7 (6), 6-17.
[14]. Verghese, B. P. (2009).Human Development and Marginalised Communities in KeralaA Study on Scheduled Caste and Tribes in Thrissur District. Working Paper Series 1, State Planning Board, Kerala.
[15]. Wagstaff, A., and Doorslaer, E.N. (2001).Quantifying Fairness, Catastrophe and Impoverishment with Application to Vietnam 1993-98. Policy Research Paper 2715, World Bank Development Research Group.
[16]. Wagstaff, A., and Van Doorslaer. (2003). Catastrophe and Impoverishment in Paying for Health Care: With applications from Vietnam 1993-98. Health Economics, 12, 921-34.
[17]. Wagstaff, A. (2008). Measuring Financial Protection in Health, World Bank, Washington DC.

Abstract:
The state of Kerala has received international acclaim for its achievement of better health indicators which are comparable with most advanced economies of the world. Kerala model of "good health at low cost" is characterised by superior health and demographic indicators with comparatively low investments. The traditions of the government support for health development, high level of education especially female education, greater health consciousness were the important contributory factors for the advancement of health care in the state.