International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
DEPOSITS AND CREDITS IN THE INDIAN COMMERCIAL BANKING SECTOR: AGGREGATE AND REGIONAL LEVELS OF ANALYSIS

Authors:
Dr. K. Shanmugan and Baria Bhagirath Prakash

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1*Dr. K. Shanmugan and 2Baria Bhagirath Prakash
1. Associate Professor, Department of Business Economics, Faculty of Commerce, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat.
2. Research Scholar, Department of Business Economics, Faculty of Commerce, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat.

MLA 8
Shanmugan, Dr. K., and Baria Bhagirath Prakash. "DEPOSITS AND CREDITS IN THE INDIAN COMMERCIAL BANKING SECTOR: AGGREGATE AND REGIONAL LEVELS OF ANALYSIS." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 3, no. 9, Sept. 2018, pp. 4776-4793, ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=330. Accessed Sept. 2018.
APA
Shanmugan, D., & Prakash, B. (2018, September). DEPOSITS AND CREDITS IN THE INDIAN COMMERCIAL BANKING SECTOR: AGGREGATE AND REGIONAL LEVELS OF ANALYSIS. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 3(9), 4776-4793. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=330
Chicago
Shanmugan, Dr. K., and Baria Bhagirath Prakash. "DEPOSITS AND CREDITS IN THE INDIAN COMMERCIAL BANKING SECTOR: AGGREGATE AND REGIONAL LEVELS OF ANALYSIS." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 3, no. 9 (September 2018), 4776-4793. Accessed September, 2018. ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=330.

References
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Abstract:
The Indian Commercial Banking Sector can be characterized as a continuously evolving set of financial stocks and flows, whose patterns, variability and trends might have important implications for both individual and macroeconomic decision making units. Movements in aggregate inflows and outflows can shed some light on the underlying behavior of the various dynamics of fund flows in the Indian Commercial Banking Sector. From this viewpoint, our study attempts to understand how the aggregate financial flows of deposits and credits have evolved during the post-liberalization period of 1995-96 up to 2016-17. The analysis carried out here reveals that there is considerable variability in the behavior of some of the measures of aggregate deposits and aggregate credits while other measures have experienced relatively more stable movements across time. We also find that the periodic behavior of annual growth rates of the key measures of aggregate deposits and credits varies considerably across different subperiods. Lastly, we find that the distribution of both deposits and credits is more biased in favour of the metropolitan centers as compared to the rural, semi-urban and urban regions.