International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
EDUCATION TO EMPLOYMENT TRANSITIONS IN SOUTH AND EAST MEDITERRANEAN COUNTRIES

Authors:
Siyka Kovacheva, Ken Roberts, Stanimir Kabaivanov

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1Siyka Kovacheva, 2Ken Roberts, 3Stanimir Kabaivanov
1,3 University of Plovdiv
2University of Liverpool

MLA 8
Kovacheva, Siyka, et al. "EDUCATION TO EMPLOYMENT TRANSITIONS IN SOUTH AND EAST MEDITERRANEAN COUNTRIES." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 3, no. 2, Feb. 2018, pp. 532-559, ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=38. Accessed 2018.
APA
Kovacheva, S., Roberts, K., & Kabaivanov, S. (2018, February). EDUCATION TO EMPLOYMENT TRANSITIONS IN SOUTH AND EAST MEDITERRANEAN COUNTRIES. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 3(2), 532-559. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=38
Chicago
Kovacheva, Siyka, Ken Roberts, and Stanimir Kabaivanov. "EDUCATION TO EMPLOYMENT TRANSITIONS IN SOUTH AND EAST MEDITERRANEAN COUNTRIES." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 3, no. 2 (February 2018), 532-559. Accessed , 2018. ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=38.

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Abstract:
This paper presents findings from surveys in 2015-16 among nationally representative samples of 15-29 year olds in five South and East Mediterranean countries (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt and Lebanon). The labour market careers of males and females, from different family class backgrounds, and with different educational attainments, in urban and rural areas and in the different countries, are compared. It is argued that rates of youth unemployment are not 'massive' and are typically well below those recorded in Southern European countries in recent years. Job quality rather than job scarcity is identified as the major labour market problem experienced by all socio-demographic groups of young people. It is responsible for in-work poverty, inflating the numbers of young women who become inactive in the labour market, and extending the queues of higher education graduates who are waiting for commensurate jobs. We also argue that education is neither the source of nor an answer to the region's youth labour market problems. In conclusion, the paper argues that current youth labour market conditions are partly long-standing and customary, but have surged as a result of population growth combined with the neo-liberal economic and social policies that the region's governments have adopted since the 1990s. The paper concludes that while labour market conditions are serious problems for the region's young people and their families, they do not as yet constitute societal crises.