International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR INVENTORY IN NAIROBI, KENYA

Authors:
Susan Changorok, Stephen W Manya and Kelvin K Juma

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1,*Susan Changorok, 2Stephen W Manya and 2Kelvin K Juma
1. Daystar University
2. Alupe University College
*. Corresponding Author

MLA 8
Changorok, Susan, et al. "VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR INVENTORY IN NAIROBI, KENYA." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 3, no. 12, Dec. 2018, pp. 6574-6590, ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=462. Accessed Dec. 2018.
APA
Changorok, S., Manya, S., & Juma, K. (2018, December). VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR INVENTORY IN NAIROBI, KENYA. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 3(12), 6574-6590. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=462
Chicago
Changorok, Susan, Stephen W Manya, and Kelvin K Juma. "VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR INVENTORY IN NAIROBI, KENYA." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 3, no. 12 (December 2018), 6574-6590. Accessed December, 2018. ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=462.

References
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Abstract:
The purpose of the study was to determine the validity and reliability of the Child and Adolescent Disruptive Behaviour Inventory (CADBI) developed by Burns (2001).In the study Quasi-experimental research design was applied. Purposive sampling was applied to identify the two schools. A sample size of 180 children aged between 9 and 14 years and who met diagnostic criteria for ODD was used. The respondents in the experimental group were treated using CBT for a period of three months while those in the control group did not receive any intervention. Demographic characteristics of the respondents were captured using questionnaires while teachers and parents of the children completed the Child and Adolescent Disruptive Behaviour Inventory (CADBI) V.2.3. The inventory had two forms CADBI: Parent (25 items) and CADBI - Teacher (25 items), each comprised of 3 subscales including Oppositional Defiant Disorder toward Adults, Oppositional Defiant Disorder toward Peers/Siblings, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. First the teachers and the parents completed the forms of the selected sample of children aged 9 to 14 years. The reliability and validity was determined. An all item test for reliability was done using the Cronbach's alpha values and Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) values in factors analysis. The CADBI tool showed Cronbach's alpha and KMO scores ranging from 0.8 to 1.0 indicating great and superb scores confirming the reliability of results both across and within the two groups. The study has implication in the field of child clinical psychology.