International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
INDIA'S INDENTURED LABOUR MIGRATION TO MALAYA: A HISTORICAL STUDY

Authors:
Dr. Sunaina Pathania

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Dr. Sunaina Pathania
Assistant Professor in History, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab, India

MLA 8
Pathania, Dr. Sunaina. "INDIA'S INDENTURED LABOUR MIGRATION TO MALAYA: A HISTORICAL STUDY." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 3, no. 4, Apr. 2018, pp. 1217-1226, ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=87. Accessed 2018.
APA
Pathania, D. (2018, April). INDIA'S INDENTURED LABOUR MIGRATION TO MALAYA: A HISTORICAL STUDY. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 3(4), 1217-1226. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=87
Chicago
Pathania, Dr. Sunaina. "INDIA'S INDENTURED LABOUR MIGRATION TO MALAYA: A HISTORICAL STUDY." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 3, no. 4 (April 2018), 1217-1226. Accessed , 2018. ijsser.org/more2018.php?id=87.

References
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Abstract:
The present study focus on the Indian labour migration to Malay Peninsula. The study deals with the historical explanation of contact between these two regions from time immemorial. Nature of migration is also the subject matter of the present study. Contact between India and Malaya dates back to the early times. Hindu, Buddhist priests and merchants have been travelling there and established their dominance in Malay courts. Many states were established in Malay Archipelago named after Indian states and rulers and were under the influence of Hindu-Buddhist religious ideas. This dominance remained undisturbed from the first century A.D till the advent of Islam with the arrival of Ulemas along with Indian Muslim merchants in Malacca from thirteenth century onwards. Hindu traders and Muslim merchants suffered heavily with the arrival of European powers particularly English East India Company. British control over Malaya later on encouraged Indians to migrate to work in plantation industries of rubber, sugarcane, oil palms and tobacco as Indentured labourers in the early nineteenth century. They were mostly South Indians. It has been found that these labourers were brought by recruiting agents from their villages to the depots like Negapatnam and then boarded them to ships to various port of Malay Peninsula. These labourers were sold under the contract of certain period upon reaching Penang. This labour system however abolished in 1910.