International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
GLIMPSES OF WOMEN IN MUGHAL MINIATURE PAINTINGS

Authors:
Dr. B. Lavanya

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Dr. B. Lavanya
Assistant Professor of History, University College of Arts and Social Sciences, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India

MLA 8
Lavanya, Dr. B. "GLIMPSES OF WOMEN IN MUGHAL MINIATURE PAINTINGS." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 4, no. 4, Mar. 2019, pp. 1663-1672, ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=122. Accessed Mar. 2019.
APA
Lavanya, D. (2019, March). GLIMPSES OF WOMEN IN MUGHAL MINIATURE PAINTINGS. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 4(4), 1663-1672. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=122
Chicago
Lavanya, Dr. B. "GLIMPSES OF WOMEN IN MUGHAL MINIATURE PAINTINGS." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 4, no. 4 (March 2019), 1663-1672. Accessed March, 2019. ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=122.

References
[1]. Beach, Milo Cleveland, Early Mughal Painting, Harvard University Press, 1987, p 49.
[2]. Bloom, Jonathan M. and Blair, Sheila S, The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture, Oxford University Press, 2009, p. 380.
[3]. Maurice S. Dimand, Mughal painting under Akbar the great, The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, v. 22, no. 10 (June, 1964, p 48.
[4]. Mohsina Aaftab, Reflection of Women in Contemporary Indian Art, International Journal of Engineering Technology Science and Research, IJETSR, Volume 4, Issue 12 December, 2017, Introduction.
[5]. Najma Khan Majlis, Representation of Professional and Working Women in Mughal Miniature Painting (16 Th -18 Th Century), Proceedings of the Indian History Congress, Vol. 67 (2006- 2007), pp. 307-311.
[6]. William Dalrymple, Art treasures of the Mughal Empire, from the 16th to the 18th centuries, The British Library Board, 2012.
[7]. Qaisar, Ahsan Jan, Som Prakash Verma and Saiyid Nurul Hasan, Art and Culture: Felicitation volume in honour of Professor S. Nurul Hasan, Tutinama Publication, 1993. pp. 60-62.
[8]. Beach, Milo Cleveland, Early Mughal Painting, Harvard University Press, 1987, p 53.
[9]. Vishakha N. Desai and Judith Spear, Life at Court: Art for India's Rulers, 16th-19th, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, 1985, 86-95.
[10]. Amina Okada, Indian Miniatures of the Mughal Court, NewYork, 1992, pp 161-162.
[11]. Wheeler, The jahangirnama: Memoirs of Jahangir, Emperor of India, Washington D.C.: Freer Gallery of Art/Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, 1999, p.368.The painting is from a private Collection. By contrast with the usual, more beautified Women faces of Mughal painting, this face is unusually forceful, with an odd touch of resemblance to Jahangir in the mouth and chin.
[12]. Inayat Khan, The Shahjahan Nama of 'Inayat Khan: An Abridged History of the Mughal . Emperor Shahjahan, Compiled by His Librarian,. A. R. Fuller, ed. W. E. Begley and Z.A. Desai Oxford University Press, Dehli, 1990, pp.185 and 192.
[13]. Pratapaditya Pal, Divine Images, HumanVisions: Bayeux Arts, 1997,pp. 145-146.
[14]. Maurice S. Dimand Mughal painting under Akbar the great, The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, v. 22, June, 1964, p. 51.
[15]. Emily Hannam, Representation at the Mughal Court in Mughal art Network, 2013, p.1.
[16]. Ibid
[17]. Begum, Gulbadan, op. cit., pp. 131-150 &194.
[18]. John Seyller, Konrad Seitz, Mughal and Deccani Paintings: The Eva and Konrad Seitz Collection of Indian Miniatures, Museum Rietberg, Switzerland, March 2011, Introdution.
[19]. Milo Cleveland Beach, Mughal and Rajput Paintings, Cambridge University Press, Volume 3, 1992 pp-214-228.
[20]. Surya Tubach, The Astounding Miniature Paintings of India's Mughal Empire, Art sy, 2018, p1.
[21]. C.M.V. Stuart, Gardens of the Great Mughals, London, 1913, p. 220.

Abstract:
The Miniature Paintings of Medieval India remained as immense significance to overcome the lacunae of knowledge of women in medieval history and art. Mughal School of Miniature Paintings is a landmark in history of Indian paintings. They depicted women in various spheres of their functioning, decoration, engagements and activities representing royal and ordinary women with varied Rajput, Deccani and European influence. The Mughal art was centered on the imperial court and was very unique in its depiction. The theme of court paintings revolved around the literary, mythical and secular themes. Scenes from the royal court, hunting expeditions, past-times, cultural pursuits, references from literary texts were often displayed through these paintings. The Mughal style of painting also inspired Hindu painters who came up with miniatures depicting stories from 'Ramayana' and 'Mahabharata'. Women of different status, were depicted, the difference clearly marked by costumes, ornamentation and placement, but with equal emphasis on beauty and style of execution.