International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
GROUP LENDING AND FINANCIAL INCLUSION: THE ROLE OF NABARD

Authors:
Dr. Shirsendu Mukherjee

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Dr. Shirsendu Mukherjee
Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, St. Paul's Cathedral Mission College, Kolkata

MLA 8
Mukherjee, Dr. Shirsendu. "GROUP LENDING AND FINANCIAL INCLUSION: THE ROLE OF NABARD." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 4, no. 3, Mar. 2019, pp. 1992-2001, ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=146. Accessed Mar. 2019.
APA
Mukherjee, D. (2019, March). GROUP LENDING AND FINANCIAL INCLUSION: THE ROLE OF NABARD. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 4(3), 1992-2001. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=146
Chicago
Mukherjee, Dr. Shirsendu. "GROUP LENDING AND FINANCIAL INCLUSION: THE ROLE OF NABARD." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 4, no. 3 (March 2019), 1992-2001. Accessed March, 2019. ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=146.

References

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Abstract:
In this paper, we have tried to justify the rationale behind Joint Liability Group Lending (JLGL) over the Limited Liability Individual Lending (LLIL), and then we have tried to show the role of NABARD towards Financial Inclusion Initiative (FII) in India using JLGL programs. The grouplending programs have proven able to reach poor individuals, particularly women that have been difficult to reach through alternative approaches. NABARD's JLGL projects and SHG-BLPs have successfully led us to adopt microcredit programs, and thus play the lead roles to promote FII in India. NABARD takes pride in the fact that the Self Help Group - Bank Linkage Programme, which is the largest microfinance programme in the world, today touches nearly 11 crore households through more than 87 lakh SHGs with deposits of over Rs. 19500 crore and annual loan off take of more than Rs. 47000 crore and loan outstanding of over Rs. 75500 crore. Several initiatives are taken by NABARD to bring the poor into the fold of formal financial service providers, and serious attempts are made to achieve the Financial Inclusion (FI) goals. It is high time to promote the working of JLGs, SHG-BLPs and FII in a complimentary manner, synergizing the strengths, and ensuring effective banking footprints in remotest of hinterlands.