International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
LIVELIHOOD VULNERABILITY AND COPING MECHANISM AMONG THE SILK WEAVERS OF SUALKUCHI, ASSAM

Authors:
Nazneen Akhtar

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Nazneen Akhtar
Research Scholar (Ph.D.), North Eastern Hill University, Shillong, Meghalaya

MLA 8
Akhtar, Nazneen. "LIVELIHOOD VULNERABILITY AND COPING MECHANISM AMONG THE SILK WEAVERS OF SUALKUCHI, ASSAM." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 4, no. 4, Apr. 2019, pp. 2959-2972, ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=220. Accessed Apr. 2019.
APA
Akhtar, N. (2019, April). LIVELIHOOD VULNERABILITY AND COPING MECHANISM AMONG THE SILK WEAVERS OF SUALKUCHI, ASSAM. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 4(4), 2959-2972. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=220
Chicago
Akhtar, Nazneen. "LIVELIHOOD VULNERABILITY AND COPING MECHANISM AMONG THE SILK WEAVERS OF SUALKUCHI, ASSAM." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 4, no. 4 (April 2019), 2959-2972. Accessed April, 2019. ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=220.

References

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Abstract:
For the past few decades, weaver communities have experienced severe vulnerability to recurrent risks, shocks and trends in the face of changing environmental conditions, rising industrialisation and urbanisation, economic liberalisation and globalisation that have caused extreme livelihood deterioration and poverty. The silk industry of Sualkuchi, Assam is no exception to these and has undergone drastic transformation processes affecting the social and economic structures of the weaving communities. The purpose of the study is to investigate the outcome of such macrolevel processes on the micro-level unit of weaver households by taking Sualkuchi as an example and to identify the coping strategies adopted by the weavers in the events of crises. Substantiated with data from both desk approaches like research articles, books, journals, govt. reports, census reports etc. and field study using focus group discussions, semi-structured interviews and questionnaire survey, the findings indicate that decreasing wages, increasing yarn price, erosion in supply base of weavers, stiff market competition from new technologies in the form of powerlooms and artificial silk fabrics are the major sources of vulnerability in the study area. Depending on the economic status of the households, the major coping strategies adopted by the weavers included migration, occupational change, distress sale of assets, borrowing (in cash or kind), reduced consumption and discontinuing education of children.