International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
STUDYING DEAF LORE IN THE DEAF COMMUNITY OF ALIPURA

Authors:
GARNEPUDI SEKHAR BABU

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GARNEPUDI SEKHAR BABU
Ph.D. Research Scholar, Centre for Folk Culture Studies, University of Hyderabad.

MLA 8
BABU, GARNEPUDI SEKHAR. "STUDYING DEAF LORE IN THE DEAF COMMUNITY OF ALIPURA." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 4, no. 5, May 2019, pp. 3294-3306, ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=247. Accessed May 2019.
APA
BABU, G. (2019, May). STUDYING DEAF LORE IN THE DEAF COMMUNITY OF ALIPURA. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 4(5), 3294-3306. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=247
Chicago
BABU, GARNEPUDI SEKHAR. "STUDYING DEAF LORE IN THE DEAF COMMUNITY OF ALIPURA." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 4, no. 5 (May 2019), 3294-3306. Accessed May, 2019. ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=247.

References
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Abstract:
This paper aim is to introduce about the Deaf People in the Village of Alipura in the State of Karnataka in India. This area of study in Folk lore Studies which is called Deaf Folklore. This paper gives you a view to understand the Deaf hood and their unique nature of their Communication Culture and about the Deaf People in the Village of Alipura, in the State of Karnataka in India. The peculiar phenomenon of this village is some of the Shia community of this village people are suffering with Deafness from the last six generations continuously and eventually it became a culture in this village. Here the striking rate of Deafness is at about 0.75 percentage compared to government estimation for the national average is 0.41 percentage (Based on data from the 2011 census) Deaf folklore helps us to understand the group of these peoples rituals shared beliefs customs and traditions some of their myths and religion in a folkloric perspective way, deaf communication is considered Talking Culture. THE DEAF LORE EXIST IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS: It includes deaf jokes, anecdotes, riddles, sign lore, ('sign play' it is including manual alphabet and number stories, sign poetry, 'catch' sign riddles, sign puns, name signs, and many other forms. In typical sign lore or sign play, signers creatively combine hand shapes and movements to create twisted signs or sign puns and other humorous changes of words). Personal-experience narratives, games and lore about notable deaf person Some individuals collects deaf cartoons, which depict deaf characters or comment on some attribute of hearing loss, deaf cartoons have appeared in both deaf and hearing publications. All of these genres depicts the strong revelation of deaf culture and heritage that stimulate deaf children's and adult's pride in their own identity.