International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
INSIGHTS FROM THE FOREST VILLAGES IN ASSAM: DISCOURSES ON THE HISTORY, CULTURE AND COMMUNITIES

Authors:
Dr. Indrani Sarma

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Dr. Indrani Sarma
Assistant Professor and Head Incharge, Department of Sociology, Cotton University, Panbazar, Guwahati, Assam (INDIA)

MLA 8
Sarma, Dr. Indrani. "INSIGHTS FROM THE FOREST VILLAGES IN ASSAM: DISCOURSES ON THE HISTORY, CULTURE AND COMMUNITIES." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 4, no. 6, June 2019, pp. 4316-4325, ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=330. Accessed June 2019.
APA
Sarma, D. (2019, June). INSIGHTS FROM THE FOREST VILLAGES IN ASSAM: DISCOURSES ON THE HISTORY, CULTURE AND COMMUNITIES. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 4(6), 4316-4325. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=330
Chicago
Sarma, Dr. Indrani. "INSIGHTS FROM THE FOREST VILLAGES IN ASSAM: DISCOURSES ON THE HISTORY, CULTURE AND COMMUNITIES." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 4, no. 6 (June 2019), 4316-4325. Accessed June, 2019. ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=330.

References
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[2]. Brandis, Dietrich. 1923. Indian Forestry, Nadu Public Domain Reprints.
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[4]. Handique, Rajib. 2004. British Forest Policy in Assam, Concept Publishing Company, New Delhi.
[5]. Lele, Sharachchandra. 2011. "Rethinking Forest Governance: Towards a Perspective beyond JFM, the Godavarman case and FRA." The Hindu: Environment Survey 2011. Chennai. P. 96.
[6]. Prasad, Archana. (ed.). 2008. "Section III: Forests Wildlife and Co-existence" in Environment, Development and Society in Contemporary India: An Introduction. New Delhi: Macmillan.
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[8]. Saikia, Arupjyoti. 2011b. "Why Ignore History to Stall the Forest Rights Act 2006?" Seven Sister's Post. Guwahati. 29 November.
[9]. Sarma, Indrani. 2012. "Forest Villages in Assam: Emergence and Evolution." Social Change and Development. OKD Institute of Social Change and Development. Guwahati. Vol. I July.
[10]. Sharma and Sarma. 2014. "Issues of Conservation and Livelihood in a Forest Village of Assam". International Journal of Rural Management. Sage Publications. 10(1). Pp 47-68.
[11]. Sharma, C.K. 2001. "Assam: Tribal Land Alienation: Government's Role." Economic and Political Weekly. Sameeksha Trust Publications, Mumbai. Vol. XXXVI. No.52. Pp. 4791-4795. 29 December.
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[14]. Upadhyay, R K. 2009, The Scheduled Tribes and Other Traditional Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act 2006 , Natraj Publishers, Dehradun.

Abstract:
The history of Assam's forests has been intertwined with the intricate ethnic and cultural patterns of the state. The remote high hills and adjacent regions are homes to a wide variety of tribal groups. Amidst the rich natural landscape of the region, the discourse on the historical formation of the forest villages in Assam is an interesting subject. The forest villages embody a unique cultural landscape with regard to the history of human-forest interactions. Moreover, the region's unique history of land alienation among the indigenous peasants and their migration into the forest areas form an important part of the discourse on human-forest interface. However, the contemporary park management reveals intense conflict between the state-initiated conservation policies and the livelihood necessities of the communities. The crisis of conservation stems mainly from the exclusionary and unilateral nature of the present conservation regime that has failed to recognise the historical dimensions of people-landscape ties and the socio-cultural specificities.