International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
WIDE RESEARCHES IN COMPRESSED LYRICS OF AFRICAN TRADITIONAL SONGS: A CASE OF MUSIC OF THE SHONA SPEAKING PEOPLE OF ZIMBABWE

Authors:
Shadreck Mataruse, Cosmas Mukandi

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1Shadreck Mataruse, 1Cosmas Mukandi
1. Department of Teacher Development, Great Zimbabwe University, P.O Box 1235, Masvingo, Zimbabwe.

MLA 8
Mataruse, Shadreck, and Cosmas Mukandi. "WIDE RESEARCHES IN COMPRESSED LYRICS OF AFRICAN TRADITIONAL SONGS: A CASE OF MUSIC OF THE SHONA SPEAKING PEOPLE OF ZIMBABWE." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 4, no. 1, Jan. 2019, pp. 540-549, ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=42. Accessed Jan. 2019.
APA
Mataruse, S., & Mukandi, C. (2019, January). WIDE RESEARCHES IN COMPRESSED LYRICS OF AFRICAN TRADITIONAL SONGS: A CASE OF MUSIC OF THE SHONA SPEAKING PEOPLE OF ZIMBABWE. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 4(1), 540-549. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=42
Chicago
Mataruse, Shadreck, and Cosmas Mukandi. "WIDE RESEARCHES IN COMPRESSED LYRICS OF AFRICAN TRADITIONAL SONGS: A CASE OF MUSIC OF THE SHONA SPEAKING PEOPLE OF ZIMBABWE." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 4, no. 1 (January 2019), 540-549. Accessed January, 2019. ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=42.

References
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Abstract:
This study examined a sample of traditional Shona music compositions. The study sought to establish how music can be used to solve life problems. This research has established that lyrics in traditional African music are more than just words arranged in stanzas. African song lyrics are so well-crafted that if well analysed, rich and informative life guidance stories can be unveiled. The researchers recorded and transcribed five traditional Shona songs that were used to gather information from the selected culture bearers within the local community. The population of this study comprised the Shona-speaking people of Zimbabwe who were seventy years and above. From this population, a sample of ten participants was selected and this became the respondents of the study. The main data collection instrument used in this research was an open-ended interview guide. Through the interview guide, the interviewees revealed lengthy life stories and lessons that can be derived from the provided songs. Data analysis revealed that African music has more value than just humanly-organised words viewed as music. The study concluded by giving recommendations that music education should not only end on performance and development of music literacy. It should help, through analysis, both educators and learners to solve real life problems. Music educators should take advantage of the wealthy music that we have inherited from the ancestors to draw life lessons.