International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
REVISITING THE STRENGTH OF TRADITIONAL - SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE IN INDIA

Authors:
Aditi Jain

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Aditi Jain
The British School, New Delhi

MLA 8
Jain, Aditi. "REVISITING THE STRENGTH OF TRADITIONAL - SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE IN INDIA." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 4, no. 8, Aug. 2019, pp. 5696-5701, ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=436. Accessed Aug. 2019.
APA
Jain, A. (2019, August). REVISITING THE STRENGTH OF TRADITIONAL - SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE IN INDIA. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 4(8), 5696-5701. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=436
Chicago
Jain, Aditi. "REVISITING THE STRENGTH OF TRADITIONAL - SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE IN INDIA." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 4, no. 8 (August 2019), 5696-5701. Accessed August, 2019. ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=436.

References
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Abstract:
In recent times, alongside the shift towards more technologically integrated urban homes and architecture, there is also seen a shift towards unsustainable and environmentally unfriendly methods of architecture. Over the centuries of the evolution of humanity, different civilizations have developed different types and forms of architecture that are suited to their local and contextual requirements. Such vernacular architecture is oft suited to the bioclimatic zone of the region, creating a space that can be lived in, in a sustainable manner. Numerous factors such as sociocultural environment, materials, economy and technological availability are responsible (alongside climate) as the main influencers of the architecture of the built environment in locations. This paper attempts to consider, in the Indian context, the value of vernacular forms of architecture in demonstrating a sustainable model which must be revisited in the age of climate change and environmental degradation, to look at alternative (and traditional) materials, methods, and styles of constructing built environments both in urban as well as rural areas in different parts of India.