International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
PERCEPTION STUDY ON GENDER FRIENDLINESS OF UNIVERSITY OF DHAKA

Authors:
Shoaib Mohammad Salman, Shaik Sayed Md Rashidul Hossain

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Shoaib Mohammad Salman1*, Shaik Sayed Md Rashidul Hossain2
1. Department of Public Administration, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh
2. Institute of Health Economics, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh
*. Corresponding Author

MLA 8
Salman, Shoaib Mohammad, and Shaik Sayed Md Rashidul Hossain. "PERCEPTION STUDY ON GENDER FRIENDLINESS OF UNIVERSITY OF DHAKA." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 4, no. 9, Sept. 2019, pp. 6112-6129, ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=469. Accessed Sept. 2019.
APA
Salman, S., & Hossain, S. (2019, September). PERCEPTION STUDY ON GENDER FRIENDLINESS OF UNIVERSITY OF DHAKA. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 4(9), 6112-6129. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=469
Chicago
Salman, Shoaib Mohammad, and Shaik Sayed Md Rashidul Hossain. "PERCEPTION STUDY ON GENDER FRIENDLINESS OF UNIVERSITY OF DHAKA." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 4, no. 9 (September 2019), 6112-6129. Accessed September, 2019. ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=469.

References
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Abstract:
Background: In most countries, students spend their maximum time in university campus. Along with traditional and academic learning, university campus is the place of learning with much broader duties, which go beyond the sphere of traditional learning. The university campus is an environment in which young people learn about social relationships, about norms, values and the 'do's' and 'don'ts. In other words, it is the environment in which professionals work with young people in a responsible manner focusing on the transfer of knowledge, skills and behaviour. The university campus is also the environment in which students learn about their gender identity, the relationships between girls and boys, boys and boys and girls and girls. It is a process of learning 'who am I in relation to the others', and the environment of campus plays an important role in this process. The issue of gender identity is closely connected to gender equality and safety in university campus. This study focuses on a variety of factors that influence the perception of gender friendliness of University of Dhaka.
Methods: For conducting this research, a total number of 200 students were chosen as respondents. The students were from different faculties such as Science, Arts, Social Science, Business Studies and Fine Arts. They all were given a structured questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of both open and close ended questions. This was done to bring out the perception of students regarding gender friendliness environment of Dhaka University Campus. These data were collected by all the group members. Then the gathered information was processed.
Results: Findings revealed that, in terms of physical, psychological and equal participation on different occasion the University of Dhaka is gender friendly. The university campus has almost equal participation in different cultural activities (odds ratio [OR]: .686; 95% confidence interval [CL]: .383- 1.880). Moreover, the harassment during cultural program is very less findings was significant (Odds Ratio [OR]: .904; 95% confidence interval [CL]: .486- 1.684).
Conclusion: There were differences in the perception of male and female students. Opinions are also altered according to the faculty to which a student belonged. The outcome showed that Dhaka University campus is gender friendly.