International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
Submit Paper

Title:
THE EFFECT OF LOVE MESSAGES ON GIFT BUDGETING

Authors:
Yanan Wang

|| ||

Yanan Wang
Williams School of Business, Bishop's University, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada, J1M 1Z7

MLA 8
Wang, Yanan. "THE EFFECT OF LOVE MESSAGES ON GIFT BUDGETING." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 4, no. 9, Sept. 2019, pp. 6193-6199, ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=474. Accessed Sept. 2019.
APA
Wang, Y. (2019, September). THE EFFECT OF LOVE MESSAGES ON GIFT BUDGETING. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 4(9), 6193-6199. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=474
Chicago
Wang, Yanan. "THE EFFECT OF LOVE MESSAGES ON GIFT BUDGETING." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 4, no. 9 (September 2019), 6193-6199. Accessed September, 2019. ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=474.

References
[1]. Belk, R. W. (1979). Gift-giving behavior. Research in Marketing, 2, 95-126.
[2]. Belk, R. W. & Coon, G. S. (1993). Gift-giving as agapic love: An alternative to the exchange paradigm based on dating experiences. Journal of Consumer Research, 20(3), 393-417.
[3]. Brander, B. (2004). Love that works: the art and science of giving. Templeton Foundation Press. Caplow, T. (1982). Christmas gifts and kin networks. American Sociological Review, 47, 383-392.
[4]. Cheal, D. (1986). The social dimensions of gift behavior. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 3, 423-439.
[5]. Cheal, D. (1987). Showing them you love them: gift giving and the dialectic of intimacy. The Sociological Review, 35, 150-169.
[6]. Cheal, D. (1996). Gifts in contemporary North America. In C. Otnes & R. F. Beltramini (Eds.), Gift giving: a research anthology (pp. 85-98), Bowling Green State University Popular Press, Bowling Green, OH.
[7]. Close, A. G. & Zinkhan, G. M. (2006). A holiday loved and loathed: a consumer perspective on Valentine's Day. In C. Pechmann & L. L. Price (Eds.), Advances in Consumer Research, vol. 33. (pp. 356-365), Association for Consumer Research, Duluth, MN.
[8]. Furnham, A. & Argyle, M. (1998). The psychology of money. Routledge.
[9]. John, O. P., Donahue, E. M. & Kentle, R. L. (1991). The Big Five Inventory---Versions 4A and 54, Berkeley, CA: University of California, Berkeley, Institute of Personality and Social Research.
[10]. Joy, A. (2001). Gift giving in Hong Kong and the continuum of social ties. Journal of Consumer Research, 28, 239-256.
[11]. Kahlil, E. L. (2004). What is altruism? Journal of Economic Psychology, 25, 97-123. Marks,
[12]. D.F. (1973). Visual imagery differences in the recall of pictures. British Journal of Psychology, 64, 17-24.
[13]. Ruth, J. A. (1996). It's the feeling that counts: toward an understanding of emotion and its influence on gift-exchange processes. In C. Otnes & R. F. Beltramini (Eds.), Gift giving: a research anthology (pp. 195-216), Bowling Green State University Popular Press, Bowling Green, OH.
[14]. Saad, G. & Gill, T. (2003). An evolutionary psychology perspective on gift giving among young adults. Psychology & Marketing, 20(9), 765-784.
[15]. Thaler, Richard H. (1980). "Toward a positive theory of consumer choice". Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization 1 (1): 39-60
[16]. Ward, M. & Broniarczyk, S. M. (2011). It's not me, it's you: how gift giving creates giver identity threat as a function of social closeness. Journal of Consumer Research, 38 (1), 164-181.
[17]. Webley, P., Lea, S.E.G., & Portalska, R. (1983). The unacceptability of money as a gift. Journal of Economic Psychology, 4, 223-238.

Abstract:
It is proposed that when people give a gift they engage in 'love accounting', so that they will spend less on it if they include a written expression of love with it. This hypothesis was tested with college students (N = 314). It was found that participants who wrote a love message to accompany a Mother's Day gift budgeted less for the gift itself than control participants (Experiment 1), and this effect was replicated for a Christmas gift (Experiment 2). The amount of effort expended by the giver on preparing the love message did not account for the effect (Experiment 3). It is concluded that a gift and its accompanying love message are mentally computed as belonging to the same "love account", implying that consumers' excessive splurging on gifts might be controlled by writing a love message before gift shopping.