International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
EGALITARIAN PEDAGOGY: REVIEWING ANDROCENTRISM IN INDIAN HIGH-SCHOOL EDUCATION

Authors:
Kashish Singh

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Kashish Singh
Pathways School

MLA 8
Singh, Kashish. "EGALITARIAN PEDAGOGY: REVIEWING ANDROCENTRISM IN INDIAN HIGH-SCHOOL EDUCATION." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 4, no. 10, Oct. 2019, pp. 6494-6499, ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=501. Accessed Oct. 2019.
APA
Singh, K. (2019, October). EGALITARIAN PEDAGOGY: REVIEWING ANDROCENTRISM IN INDIAN HIGH-SCHOOL EDUCATION. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 4(10), 6494-6499. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=501
Chicago
Singh, Kashish. "EGALITARIAN PEDAGOGY: REVIEWING ANDROCENTRISM IN INDIAN HIGH-SCHOOL EDUCATION." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 4, no. 10 (October 2019), 6494-6499. Accessed October, 2019. ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=501.

References
[1]. Elliott, K. (2010). "They Should Call It Homophosexism": Gender and Sexual Inequality in High School. PsycEXTRA Dataset. doi:10.1037/e679242011-001
[2]. Failures of Androcentric Studies of Women's Education in the Third World +. (2017). International Feminist Perspectives on Educational Reform, 75-88. doi:10.4324/9781315174785-7
[3]. Gender Inequalities and the Curriculum. (n.d.). Key Concepts for Understanding Curriculum, 214-223. doi:10.4324/9780203326893_chapter_20
[4]. Karpowitz, C. F., & Mendelberg, T. (2014). Gender Inequality in School Boards. The Silent Sex. doi:10.23943/princeton/9780691159751.003.0011
[5]. Mansoor, M., Maryam, & Srivastava, Y. (2017, February 21). Sexism In The Classroom: 7 Examples From Indian & Pakistani Textbooks That Reinforce Regressive Gender Stereotypes. Retrieved from https://feminisminindia.com/2017/02/21/7-textbooksreinforce-harmful-gender-stereotypes
[6]. Singh, B. (2012). Women Writers: Standing up against the patriarchy. Think India, 15(1). doi:10.26643/think-india.v15i1.7848
[7]. Sircar, O. (2018). Doing and undoing feminism. Men and Feminism in India, 73-99. doi:10.4324/9781351048248-5

Abstract:
This paper looks to bridge existing gaps by providing an objective review of different instances of sexist content, pedagogy, and learning styles in the Indian high-school education, to lastly attempt at thinking of what it means to have an equal, or egalitarian pedagogy - is it possible to think of writings and methods of teaching that are gender-neutral, gender-equal, or at the very least, accessible to people of different gender identities? The paper reviews representations of class, race, and gender in textbooks, and tries to find patterns in a well considered and thoughtful form. Moreover, the paper looks at existing studies by organizations such as Feminism in India (FII) of South Asian textbooks including those in India, and the androcentric representations in them, to try and identify the causes of such discriminatory forms of representations and what societal norms are being propagated in the form of an education, where most students consider what is written in textbooks as true beyond all doubt, thus influencing their mindset and ideology at a key stage of their growth and intellectual development, and specifically at a key transition phase of high-school. The paper further moves beyond mere considerations of gender to look at class and race in the lens of intersectionality.