International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
HOW INDIAN ECONOMY STARTED CHANGING (2011- 2014)

Authors:
SOHAM PATIL

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SOHAM PATIL
MAHARASHTRA NATIONAL LAW UNIVERSITY (MNLU), NAGPUR

MLA 8
PATIL, SOHAM. "HOW INDIAN ECONOMY STARTED CHANGING (2011- 2014)." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 4, no. 12, Dec. 2019, pp. 7336-7344, ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=560. Accessed Dec. 2019.
APA
PATIL, S. (2019, December). HOW INDIAN ECONOMY STARTED CHANGING (2011- 2014). Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 4(12), 7336-7344. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=560
Chicago
PATIL, SOHAM. "HOW INDIAN ECONOMY STARTED CHANGING (2011- 2014)." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 4, no. 12 (December 2019), 7336-7344. Accessed December, 2019. ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=560.

References
[1]. Books Datt and Sundharam. (2008), Indian Economy, S Chand and Company, New Delhi
[2]. Misra S.K and Puri (2009), Indian Economy, Himalaya Publication, New Delhi Kapila Uma (2008), Indian Economy, Academic Foundation Publication, New Delhi
[3]. Gupta K.C. and Kaur Harinder, (2004), New Indian Economy and Reform, Deep and Deep Publication, New Delhi

Abstract:
India's economic freedom score is 55.2, making its economy the 119th freest in the 2013 Index. Its score is 0.6 point higher than last year, with improvements in the management of public finance and monetary freedom offsetting a continuing decline in freedom from corruption. India is ranked 23rd out of 41 countries in the Asia-Pacific region, and its overall score is below the world average. India's institutional shortcomings continue to undermine the foundations for long-term economic development. In the absence of a well-functioning legal and regulatory framework, corruption throughout the economy is becoming a more serious drag on the emergence of a more dynamic private sector. The state's presence in the economy remains extensive through state-owned enterprises and wasteful subsidy programs that result in chronically high budget deficits. Progress in structural reform has been uneven and often stalled. Plans to open up key service sectors have been reversed, and no significant reforms have been implemented effectively in recent years. Efforts continue, however. Reform measures aiming at reducing government subsidies and encouraging foreign direct investment were announced in 2012.