International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
TB-ILAAJ: A STUDY OF BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS INSIGHTS AND APPLICATIONS TO REDUCE THE BURDEN OF TUBERCULOSIS IN INDIA THROUGH A MOBILE APPLICATION

Authors:
Vivhan Rekhi

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Vivhan Rekhi
The British School, New Delhi

MLA 8
Rekhi, Vivhan. "TB-ILAAJ: A STUDY OF BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS INSIGHTS AND APPLICATIONS TO REDUCE THE BURDEN OF TUBERCULOSIS IN INDIA THROUGH A MOBILE APPLICATION." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 4, no. 12, Dec. 2019, pp. 7434-7447, ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=568. Accessed Dec. 2019.
APA
Rekhi, V. (2019, December). TB-ILAAJ: A STUDY OF BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS INSIGHTS AND APPLICATIONS TO REDUCE THE BURDEN OF TUBERCULOSIS IN INDIA THROUGH A MOBILE APPLICATION. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 4(12), 7434-7447. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=568
Chicago
Rekhi, Vivhan. "TB-ILAAJ: A STUDY OF BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS INSIGHTS AND APPLICATIONS TO REDUCE THE BURDEN OF TUBERCULOSIS IN INDIA THROUGH A MOBILE APPLICATION." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 4, no. 12 (December 2019), 7434-7447. Accessed December, 2019. ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=568.

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Abstract:
Behavioral economics is a branch of economics that merges psychological, cognitive, emotional, and circumstantial factors to better understand human decision making. It posits that humans are not perfectly rational actors; rather, they are prone to inherent biases that can be predicted. Through understanding these nuances of human decision making, behavioral economics has wide-ranging applications in designing better policy and incentives. This paper looks specifically at applications of behavioral economics in developing a theoretical personal healthcare app to ensure and incentivize patient adherence to long-term Tuberculosis treatment regimes. Namely, the theoretical app applies behavioral economics theories including loss aversion, dual-system theory, nudges and choice architecture, uncertainty, and mental bandwidth. Through these behavioral nudges, the app has the potential to not only lead to better health outcomes for patients, but also better public health outcomes by reducing the burden of TB in India.