International Journal of Social Science & Economic Research
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Title:
WORK DEMANDS, COPING STRATEGIES, AND WELL-BEING IN CALL CENTRE EMPLOYEES: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

Authors:
Narsingh Kumar

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Narsingh Kumar
Central University of South Bihar

MLA 8
Kumar, Narsingh. "WORK DEMANDS, COPING STRATEGIES, AND WELL-BEING IN CALL CENTRE EMPLOYEES: A QUALITATIVE STUDY." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, vol. 4, no. 2, Feb. 2019, pp. 1334-1345, ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=97. Accessed Feb. 2019.
APA
Kumar, N. (2019, February). WORK DEMANDS, COPING STRATEGIES, AND WELL-BEING IN CALL CENTRE EMPLOYEES: A QUALITATIVE STUDY. Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research, 4(2), 1334-1345. Retrieved from ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=97
Chicago
Kumar, Narsingh. "WORK DEMANDS, COPING STRATEGIES, AND WELL-BEING IN CALL CENTRE EMPLOYEES: A QUALITATIVE STUDY." Int. j. of Social Science and Economic Research 4, no. 2 (February 2019), 1334-1345. Accessed February, 2019. ijsser.org/more2019.php?id=97.

References
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Abstract:
The present qualitative study was conducted to explore the impact of work demands (emotional labor, role conflict and performance monitoring) on mental health and well-being of call centre employees (agents). The study also tries to investigate that what coping strategies call centre agents used to cope with these work demands. Open ended questions were asked to 50 call centre employees through interview method of their feelings about their job demands, interactions with customers, stress experiences, their well-being, social support, and about their adjustment in life, etc. Weft QDA (version 1.0.1.0) was used for the analysis of the data. Results indicated that despite an unusual and complex work setting, call centre employees do not reported any major discomfort or stress after working for initial period. Initially employees find call centre job interesting and they enjoyed being with young work force, but over a period of time call centre job becomes boring and tiresome for some of its employees. Unusual working hours (night shifts) affect their social life. Overall, the findings of the study does not support the traditional view of call centres as "electronic sweatshops" (Fernie and Metcalfe, 1998) and "assembly lines in the head" (Taylor and Bain, 1999).